Intravenous grafts of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells reduce behavioral deficits in experimental ischemic stroke

Amniotic fluid has been investigated as new cell source for stem cells in the development of future cell-based transplantation. This study reports isolation of viable human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells, labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles, and its effect on focal cerebral ischemia–reperfusion injury in Wistar rats. Middle cerebral artery occlusion of 60 min followed by reperfusion for 1 h, 6 h, and 24 h was employed in the present study to produce ischemia and reperfusion-induced cerebral injury in rats. Tests were employed to assess the functional outcome of the sensorimotor center activity in the brain, through a set of modified neurological severity scores used to assess motor and exploratory capacity 24 h, 14, and 28 days after receiving cellular therapy via tail vein. In our animal model of stroke, transplanted cells migrated to the ischemic focus, infarct volume decreased, and motor deficits improved. Therefore, we concluded that these cells appear to have beneficial effects on the ischemic brain, possibly based on their ability to enhance endogenous repair mechanisms.
Keywords
intravenous grafts;  stroke;  human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells;  cell labeling;  cell culture

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Sibov TT, Pavon LF, Cabral FR, Cunha IF, Oliveira DM, Souza JG, et al. Intravenous grafts of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells reduce behavioral deficits in experimental ischemic stroke. Cell Transplant.. 2019 Jun;28(9-10):1306–1320. doi:10.1177/0963689719854342.
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